6/29/12

friday links

There seems to be a lot of people on the paleo, primal way of eating? I'm curious about it too, and have dabbled in it.
Found this wonderful website Marks Daily Apple. All about primal living (exercising) and eating.
He talks about what foods are primal (is it primal?), shares reader weight loss and health stories, as well as recipes (good ones, not crazy ones).

Do you like garden houses? Then you'll love this.

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The incredible hyperreal paintings of Luigi Benedicenti at London’s Albemarle Gallery. Love this.

(I didn't even know this existed) Orthorexia: when healthy eating turns obsessive.

Top healthy and "portable" high-protein snacks. (I love pumpkin seeds)

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Life size (real) dollhouse.

15 famous authors and why they write.

22 Kettlebell exercises. I just bought a kettlebell this winter. I should start using it.

Do you love to read adventure books? I do. Here are few written by women. Great list--great for summer reading:



Why you should spiral cut your hot dogs before grilling. (hint: you can fit more toppings on this way).


Well written write up and interview about Chef Mark Samuelssons' new memoir book. From NY Times.

Paleo chocolate cake. Done really (really) well.

A trip to deserted island: Tortugas Island (florida keys). I had never heard of this place.

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Giveaway over at Bake or Break. You get to choose what you want as the prize. Those are the best giveaways. Head on over.

Crave cucumbers in the summer? Spicy Sichuan Cucumber Salad with Persian Cucumbers.

How to make easy Gazpacho.

Strawberry-yogurt popsicles.

Savannah Buttermint Ice Cream. I am dying to make this.

Fight muscle soreness with cherries. (anyone know if this is true? or do you just have to consume like a ton of cherries for this to work?)

80 healthy recipe substitutions. Excellent list!

What's on your summer reading list? Here are a few of mine:


At Home on the Range by Margret Yardley & Elizabeth Gilbert

"This book is a beautiful time capsule that looks back to the roots of American gastronomy, when the values of gardening and fresh ingredients were the primary inspiration. Margaret Yardley Potter’s warm, witty stories and recipes show us that our great-grandmothers instinctually understood that food is central to a life well-lived." ~~Alice Waters


Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman's Skiff by rosemary mahoney. "...When Rosemary Mahoney, in 1998, took a solo trip down the Nile in a seven-foot rowboat, she discovered modern Egypt for herself. As a rower, she faced crocodiles and testy river currents; as a female, she confronted deeply-held beliefs about foreign women while cautiously remaining open to genuine friendship; and, as a traveler, she experienced events that ranged from the humorous to the hair-raising--including an encounter that began as one of the most frightening of her life and ended as an edifying and chastening lesson in human nature and cultural misunderstanding. Whether she's meeting Nubians and Egyptians, or finding connections to Westerners who traveled up the Nile in earlier times--Florence Nightingale and Gustave Flaubert among them--Mahoney's informed curiosity about the world never ceases to captivate the reader".


The Hidden Staircase: Nancy Drew mysteries. Yep! Every summer I LOVE to dig out my old Nancy Drew books and re-read them. As a kid I could never get enough of her.


The Secret of the Old Clock.


The American Heiress by daisy goodwin. Love Downtown Abbey? "...."Anyone suffering Downton Abbey withdrawal symptoms (who isn't?) will find an instant tonic in Daisy Goodwin’s The American Heiress. The story of Cora Cash, an American heiress in the 1890s who bags an English duke, this is a deliciously evocative first novel that lingers in the mind." --Allison Pearson, New York Times bestselling author of I Don’t Know How She Does It and I Think I Love You. Be careful what you wish for. Traveling abroad with her mother at the turn of the twentieth century to seek a titled husband, beautiful, vivacious Cora Cash, whose family mansion in Newport dwarfs the Vanderbilts’, suddenly finds herself Duchess of Wareham, married to Ivo, the most eligible bachelor in England. Nothing is quite as it seems, however: Ivo is withdrawn and secretive, and the English social scene is full of traps and betrayals. Money, Cora soon learns, cannot buy everything, as she must decide what is truly worth the price in her life and her marriage...." from amazon review


Yes Chef: A Memoir by marcus samuelsson. The NY Times really made me want to read this. I love chef memoirs.

Have a great weekend?

8 comments:

  1. I loved Nancy Drew growing up!! I might just have to pick one up and re-read!

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  2. I think I figured out what orthoexia meant right around the same time I realized that some vegetarians eat fish :) i.e. pescatarians. There's a name, category, and sub-grouping for everything these days!

    Enjoy your weekend!

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  3. That doll house is amazing! Love that you have instagram...although you always have me craving icecream!!

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  4. I've been primal for 6 months...love everything about it! Lost 40 pounds effortlessly, got my energy back and feel pretty amazing. Mark's Daily Apple is the bestest!

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    Replies
    1. michele that is AWESOME.
      and effortlessly too
      which book did you get to start you learning about what you can and cannot eat?

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  5. Love your Friday fun stuff.
    Re cherries: they do lots of good things for your body. It's amazing. Heart, bladder, arthritis. There's a company in Michigan that sells cherries in pill form.

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  6. love both those nancy drew books!

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  7. I get the dried cherries from Costco, they're soooo good. I've read different studies that say as few as six cherries a day can help, that 15 a day can get people off gout medication, and that 45 will do major good things for people with arthritis (that particular one was funded by the cherry lobby, so I'm guessing you probably don't need quite so many).

    I do a big handful a day (probably a few more than 15), and I think it's made a difference (I am dealing with both gout and arthritis, as well as a few other immune-related challenges). I'd say that if you have these problems too, a bag of cherries are a pretty delicious thing to try out... what's the worst that happens, you get to eat cherries for a while? Oh darn!

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